Quality + Certification = Success!

SimpleQuE congratulates the following companies on their successful certification and commitment to quality.

image002

SimpleQuE (an ISO 9001:2015 certified company) assists organizations with implementation, improvement or transition of these standards by providing customized consulting, training and internal auditing services and solutions. Contact us for more information.

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Jim Lee presents at ASA’s 2017 Annual Conference

ASA Conf 170710

Aviation Suppliers Association (ASA) is a not-for-profit association that represents over 600 worldwide member companies that lead critical logistics programs, purchasing efforts, and distribution of aircraft parts globally.

The 2017 ASA Annual Conference takes place July 9-11 in Reston, VA; and is one of the largest for the aviation distributor industry. The event draws aviation professionals worldwide with a range of business development and management, quality assurance, legal/regulatory and general industry topics. The itinerary includes general sessions, workshops, exhibitors, and networking events. SimpleQuE founder Jim Lee presented at the conference on Monday, July 10 about risk management requirements for distributors that are ISO and/or AS certified.

“This is our second year to present on 3 different topics.” said Lee. “We appreciate this opportunity to network with our clients and aircraft parts distributors. Last year we had three simpleQuE attendees at the conference, and this year two. By attending these conferences, we get a lot of information and value that we share with our consulting clients and other staff members.”

Aviation Suppliers Association promotes safety, regulatory compliance and ethical business practices among aviation parts suppliers throughout the aviation community. Over 300 companies have received accreditation to the ASA-100 Quality System Standard and FAA Advisory Circular 00-56 since 1996.  ASA Certification Body also certifies companies to ISO 9001, AS9120, AS9100, and AS9110.

The History of AS9100

Once again, the IAQGs AS9100 standard has undergone a new revision. The latest version of this standard adds requirements for product safety, counterfeit parts, formal processes for operational risks, awareness, and ethics and human factors. Read more about the journey this pivotal standard has taken over the years.
SQ_Infographic_AS9100

 

Don’t forget, June 15, 2018 is the final transition audit deadline for the new AS9100 standard. Learn more by viewing our transition timeline.

SimpleQuE shares an important AS9100:2016 transition timeline reminder from IAQG

SQ_Infographic_AS9100Timeline Revised for Sept release

“The IAQG Other Party Management Team (OPMT) would like to remind all certificated organizations that there are two key target dates within the “International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG) Other Party Management Team (OPMT) Supplemental Rule 003 – Rules for 9100/9110/9120:2016 and 9101:2016 Transition” document that were established in order to ensure that a certified organization transition occurs prior to the 15 September 2018 end date.

The first key target has now passed. In accordance with SR003; “10.a By March 1, 2017 AQMS certified organizations shall communicate with their CB to establish an intended date for 9100/9110/9120:2016 AQMS standard transition readiness.”  We greatly appreciate the efforts that certificated organizations have taken to meet this requirement and would like to remind those that have not yet made transition plans; there is an elevated risk of not meeting the 2018 end date if you have not established and communicated the aforementioned date to your CB.

The second key target date in SR003 is 15 June 2017. In accordance with SR003; 9.g No initial, surveillance or recertification audits shall be started to the previous versions of the AQMS standards after June 15, 2017.” We must ensure that transition has a start date or Certification Bodies may face auditor resource issues in 2018 as the transition end date approaches.”

SimpleQuE is an ISO 9001:2015 certified company that provides ISO, AS and IATF consulting services from quality experts to assist organizations in successfully meeting transition targets. Contact us for more information.  IAQG also provides AS9100 D transition support materials.

Risk Management for Aerospace and Defense Industries

Aerospace transport and people. Two pilots dressed in uniform flying jet airliner on sunny day sitting inside aircraft cockpit surrounded by equipment. Selective focus on captain's hand on power lever

In a business environment failure and negative consequences are the last things anyone wants to encounter.  But the reality is that risk is always present and comes from multiple sources, whether from inside the organization or from external elements. Due to the complexity of aviation, space, and defense processes, products, and services, and the severity of the potential consequences of failures, a formal process to manage operational risks is required.

The exercise of risk management is how a company proactively applies quality standards to keep a lid on risk as much as possible from creating negative ramifications in the supply chain or to production or scheduling, etc. While to some it can seem like bureaucracy or unnecessary controls, risk management pays for itself many times over with the cost avoidance it helps secure. All it takes is one bad event to see why risk management is so important, that’s assuming the company survives that event.

The elements of risk management are clear and straightforward as well. It’s an ongoing, cyclical process of identifying risks, assessing them, proactively reducing their probability of occurring by control, and mitigating those that are allowable. But just following the process alone doesn’t explain why a business should have a risk management process in the first place.

In AS9100 the operational risk management process is supported by specific requirements throughout clause 8, to drive an enhanced focus on:

  • understanding risk impacts on operational processes; and
  • making decisions on operational processes and actions to manage (e.g., prevent, mitigate, control) potential undesired effects.

Within aviation, aerospace, and defense, risk is expressed as a combination of severity and likelihood of having a potential negative impact to processes, products, services, customer, or end users. In AS9100, operational risk management must include how the company defines their risk assessment criteria (e.g., likelihood, consequences, risk acceptance), and ultimately acceptance of risks remaining after implementation of any mitigating actions. Something as simple as the example below may be the simplest way to quantify risks. More detail could be utilized with scoring.

table

The standard requires an aerospace quality management system that takes into account the identification of various risks related to organizational circumstances in regard to its needs, business objectives, product range, applied processes and the size of the organization.  Given the fact that risk can trigger catastrophic results when unmanaged, every aerospace process must have the ability to reduce the occurrences and impacts of unacceptable risks, if not eliminate them entirely. And a risk management process is the only consistent way to assess risks and quantify when they are acceptable risks or when action is required.

Benefits to companies that incorporate risk management through ISO and AS quality standards include:

  • An increased probability of meeting schedules, budgets and production objectives
  • The means of making management proactive instead of reactive to risk issues
  • An increased awareness across the organization to recognize and mitigate risk
  • Reduced warranty and field complaints
  • Reduced supply chain risks
  • An increased ability to successfully plan, manage and implement changes (whether customer, supplier or self-initiated)
  • An increased ability to comply with laws, regulations, and customer requirements
  • An enhanced capability to track financial expenditures to poor results, and
  • Improved relations with stakeholders who see the results of quality and risk management in place

Planes, Change and Automobiles

transition sign

Tight Transition Timelines

Important updates regarding the Aerospace and Automotive industries were shared with SimpleQuE representatives attending the Smithers Quality Assessment’s annual conference on July 14th.  Speakers from the International Automotive Oversight Bureau (IAOB) and International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG) provided insight into the upcoming changes to the ISO/TS 16949 and AS9100 standards.  All are targeted for release in the last 4 months of this year, with certification bodies ready to audit to the new standards in the first quarter of 2017 for AS and possibly later for TS.  Transition timelines are going to be exceedingly tight.  Here are a few key takeaways:

ISO/TS 16949:2016

  • The IAOB recommends TS certified companies upgrade to ISO 9001:2015 now, prior to upgrading to TS. The benefit will be less audit days when upgrading to 16949:2016
  • The IATF is still working on how it can have more time beyond the September 15, 2018 expiration, before ISO/TS 16949:2009 expires and the 16949:2016 standard has to be implemented.
  • The IAOB was very careful not to say the new TS standard is based around ISO 9001:2015, but said it does follow the 10 clauses from Annex SL. They were also careful not to call the new standard ISO/TS 16949:2016.
  • There are only 4,353 active TS certificates in the US, down from a high of almost 6,000 prior to the recession.
  • OEM’s are raising the bar with the new TS standard and performance is key for the automotive supply chain.  (See our previous post – Shifting into High Gear for what we learned about the Rome, Italy meeting with TS stakeholders earlier this year.  Many things are still changing from that meeting, so expect differences with the final release.)

AS9100:2016

  • AS is accelerating requirements to upgrade. After June 15, 2017 no certification body can perform audits to the current AS standards.  After 6/15/17 all scheduled surveillance and recertification audits must be to the new 2016 standard.
  • This prevents companies from waiting until the last minute to upgrade because there are a limited number of AS certification body auditors and it would not be possible to get everyone upgraded near the deadline.
  • There is concern regarding the extremely tight timelines. Companies have a shorter amount of time to retrain internal auditors, conduct audits, do a new management review, and get upgraded at the next scheduled audit after 6/15/17.  Watch for simpleQuE’s aerospace training on the new standard.
  • Here are two scenarios of the new timing requirements communicated by SQA:
    • If your last registrar audit was June 1, 2016 then you could delay upgrading to your June 2018 annual audit.
    • If your last registrar audit was June 21, 2016 then you must upgrade during your June 2017 annual audit, and have no choice to delay until 2018.

Keep up with simpleQuE’s blog posts and training courses for the latest information affecting the quality world.

Aerospace Standards – Change is in the Air

 

nqa

It was once said that “Progress is impossible without change…” and that rings true in the world of quality management systems.  The ISO 9001:2015 revisions brought about many changes we feel will only improve the certification process. This month we are focusing on the changes to the Aerospace Industry and what we are seeing with the revised ISO AS9100:2016 standards above and beyond ISO. Continue reading “Aerospace Standards – Change is in the Air”

Preparing for Change and Risk

Shirley Kennedy, simpleQuE Project Manager. Learn more about Shirley here.
Shirley Kennedy, simpleQuE Project Manager. Learn more about Shirley here.

The simpleQuE team is preparing for the ISO changes and recently attended NQA’s overview of the draft changes to ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015.

The major revisions of both standards are due by September and will incorporate this high level structure divided into 10 sections: Continue reading “Preparing for Change and Risk”