Blog

Transition Time

The deadline for transition to ISO 9001:2015, ISO 14001:2015, AS9100:2016 and IATF 16949:2016 is fast approaching. Have you completed the transition process? If not, take a look at our blog post “The Countdown Begins” to learn how to get started before it’s too late.

Note that if your next audit is a recertification and upgrade, you will need to perform the audit at least 2 months prior to your certificate expiring to give you enough time to address any potential nonconformance issues.

 

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Diesel USA RTC – Where Quality is Turbocharged

From Diesel’s founder’s beginnings in 1950 through today, the Diesel group of companies has developed close relationships with the world’s leading OEM diesel component manufacturers.  Providing superior technical knowledge, state-of-the-art equipment, and a vast range of inventory to help commercial and consumer diesel owners get their equipment up and running quickly and dependably is Diesel’s main goal.  In 2014 the “Diesel USA Reman Technical Center” became the newest branch in the Diesel USA Group where they produce remanufactured technical components including turbochargers and mass rebuilding of any other product that fits in the company’s scope while continually improving Diesel’s Quality Management System.

Diesel USA RTC has maintained an ISO 9001:2008 certificate since 2014 and recently passed its ISO 9001:2015 transition audit with Smithers Quality Assessments. Congratulations!


SimpleQuE Earns ISO 9001:2015 Recertification

ISO 9001 - quality management system. Businessman select ISO 9001 certification.

We did it!  SimpleQuE has been recertified to ISO 9001:2015 by Eagle Certification Group through December 2020. Our initial ISO 9001:2015 certification was in November 2015 right after the standard was released and we were one of the first to be certified.

“The majority of companies have waited until the last possible year to upgrade to the new standards. This is consistent with the past, when changes to the standards occurred. The problem now is that all the key standards (ISO, automotive, aerospace, environmental) have the same expiration date of 9/15/18 and everyone is rushing to get it done at the last minute. The capacity constraints on registrars, consultants, and auditors is evident and organizations that have not begun the transition process are in serious jeopardy of losing their certification, especially if attempting to wing it with the registrar and not doing anything new to comply with the new standards.”
-Jim Lee, simpleQuE President.

The ISO 9001:2015 certification provides us many benefits and is a big differentiator over our competitors. This is especially critical since this standard and common structure are integrated into other management system standards like environmental, aerospace and automotive.  It also provides simpleQuE with cost savings, an innovative service offering, market access, and a high level of customer confidence and satisfaction.

As an organization that is ISO certified, it proves to our clients that Quality Excellence can be made Simple. It’s what our company name means. For over 10 years, our simple approach has allowed us to have a quality manual that is only a few pages as we put our simple best practices to work in our own company. At simpleQuE, we don’t take a cookie cutter approach, therefore, we don’t implement our processes at our client sites. We look at what works for them and leave that alone, only focusing on those areas that don’t comply.  Considering each company’s culture and unique situation results in different solutions for each client.

As the transition deadline of September 14th approaches, we encourage organizations that are still working on their implementation or transition certification to keep at it, ask questions, and ask for assistance.  Demonstrating a commitment to maintaining the effectiveness of your system, continual improvement and customer satisfaction will put you in the lead.  ISO 9001:2015 certification is an internationally recognized distinction that will benefit your organization for years to come.



Discovering Earth While Reaching for the Moon

On December 24, 1968 the Apollo 8 astronauts, Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders shared this iconic “Earthrise” photo during the first manned mission to the moon.  The first astronauts to orbit the moon and spend Christmas in space.

Knowing that millions of people would listen to their transmission on Christmas Eve, and as NASA’s only guidance was to do something appropriate, the astronauts decided on the book of Genesis. Lovell explained, “The first ten verses of Genesis is the foundation of many of the world’s religions, not just the Christian religion,” added Lovell. “There are more people in other religions than the Christian religion around the world, and so this would be appropriate to that and so that’s how it came to pass.”

So while orbiting above the lunar surface, the astronauts shared images of the Earth and moon and took turns reading from the book of Genesis, closing with a wish for everyone “on the good Earth.”

Seeing Earth rise beyond the barren lunar surface gave us a new perspective of our home planet and became the icon of the environmental movement. Anders has said that despite all the training and preparation for an exploration of the moon, the astronauts ended up discovering Earth.

The crew launched into orbit on December 21, and after circling the moon 10 times on Christmas Eve, prepared to return home. On Christmas morning, mission control anxiously waited to hear that Apollo 8’s engine burn had successfully propelled it outside the moon’s gravitational pull. Confirmation arrived when Lovell radioed, “Roger, please be informed there is a Santa Claus.”

In 2013 NASA recreated the historic moment when the crew first saw and photographed the Earth rising from behind the Moon. The visualization captures the view from both inside and outside the spacecraft and is synced with the onboard audio of the astronauts. Watching and listening in, you can’t help but feel their wonder and excitement.

Wherever you are on Earth, our team at simpleQuE wishes all a Merry Christmas, cherished holiday celebrations and a New Year filled with peace and the spirit of innovation and exploration!


The 7 Major Components of IATF 16949

 

IATF 16949:2016 defines the quality management system requirements for the design and development, production and, when relevant, the assembly, installation and services of automotive-related products including products with embedded software. The focus of this automotive standard is the development of a QMS that provides for continual improvement, emphasizing defect prevention and the reduction of waste in the supply chain. Combined with applicable Customer Specific Requirements, IATF 16949 is also fully aligned with the structure and requirements of ISO 9001:2015.
The standard is divided into ten sections – the first three are introductory, with the remaining seven containing the requirements for the Quality Management System. Below is a brief summary of Sections 4-10:

Section 4: Context of the Organization

The organization determines its context in terms of the QMS, including interested parties and their needs and expectations. It also defines the requirements for determining the scope of the QMS, as well as general QMS requirements.

Section 5: Leadership

Top management is required to demonstrate leadership and commitment to the QMS, along with defining corporate responsibility and the quality policy. The top management must also assign process owners along with other roles and responsibilities.

Section 6: Planning

The planning section defines requirements for addressing risks and opportunities and the requirements for risk analysis. This clause also includes requirements for preventive actions, contingency plans, and quality objectives and plans to achieve them.

Section 7: Support

This section covers requirements for supporting processes and resources. It defines requirements for people, infrastructure, work environment, monitoring and measuring resources, organizational knowledge, auditor competence, awareness, communication, and documented information.

Section 8: Operation

The product requirements deal with all aspects of the planning and creation of the product or service. This section includes requirements on planning, product requirements review, design, purchasing, creating the product or service, and controlling the equipment used to monitor and measure the product or service. IATF 16949 allows for requirements in clause 8.3, regarding design and development of products, to be excluded if they are not applicable to the company.

Section 9: Performance Evaluation

This section includes requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of the QMS – assessing customer satisfaction, internal audits, monitoring and measurement of manufacturing processes, and management review.

Section 10: Improvement

The last section focuses on continual improvement of the QMS, including requirements for nonconformities and corrective actions, problem solving, and error-proofing processes.


These sections are based on a Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle, which uses these elements to implement change within the processes of the organization in order to drive and maintain improvements within the processes.

IATF 16949 is a standard that benefits businesses large and small. The experts at simpleQuE can help your business achieve this standard, ensuring your business cost savings and efficiencies.


The Time Is Now – Preparing for a Successful IATF 16949 Transition

Automotive industry manufacture line with different metal parts

The transition to IATF 16949 has been a rough one according to industry experts.  More than 68,000 organizations certified to IATF 16949:2009 (and 6,382 companies in the US) will need to undergo a transition audit to IATF 16949:2016. As of April 2017, 181 upgrade audits had been completed, resulting in an average of 5.3 nonconformities and approximately one major nonconformity (.73) per audit.

The top five nonconformities overall are “total productive maintenance” (48 nonconformities), “control plan” (38), “contingency plans” (37), “control of production service provision” (26), and “internal auditor competency” (23). Based on automotive industry datathe top-five major nonconformance clauses are customer-specific requirements (7 nonconformities), internal auditor competency (7), quality management system (QMS) audit (7), TPM (6), and management review inputs (6).

For companies that have yet to transition to IATF 16949, you do not want to wait any longer. The deadline for suppliers to transition to the new standard is your next scheduled annual audit.  All audits as of October 2017 have to be to the new IATF standard.   And note that the IATF will not be granting waivers for organizations that can’t meet the transition plan timing.

According to Russ Hopkins, head of supplier technical assistance for Ford Motor Company, “Globally, over 1,200 audits need to take place each week, which averages out to about one per week per auditor,” he said. “This is doable with the proper planning.  It’s doable as long as people do not wait until the last minute.”

This process can seem daunting to suppliers, but Hopkins notes there are several steps to a successful IATF 16949 transition:

  • Confirm dates for the transition audit with your certification body. Upgrade has to occur at your next scheduled audit.
  • Develop a work plan back from the date of the transition audit
  • Review the requirements and provide feedback regarding any concerns (suppliers contact AIAG, certification bodies contact their oversight offices, and OEM through their IATF representative)
  • Allow enough time after the transition audit to address any non-conformances. All findings must be closed in 60 days.

For those with an existing IATF 16949 certificate with one or more nonconformities of the audit to IATF 16949 which are not either 100% resolved or closed within the required timeframe, the transition audit will be considered “failed” and the IATF database will be updated accordingly.  The certification decision shall be negative which means the IATF 16949:2009 certificate is withdrawn and the client has to start over with an initial certification audit. (International Automotive Task Force)

For more information on transitioning to IATF 16949 visit our website.


Silberline

Silberline was founded in 1945 by aluminum industry pioneer Ernest Scheller.  His vision was to create a business that would provide the highest quality products and customized service with unyielding integrity.  Today Silberline continues that vision as a global manufacturer and supplier of high quality special effect and performance pigments that enhance the visual appeal of coatings, paints, inks, plastics and textiles. Still a family owned business, Silberline has over 700 employees world-wide with manufacturing, technical and research centers in Europe, Asia and North America.  Their products are utilized in a variety of markets including automotive, graphic arts and printing inks, plastics, and industrial coatings.

In 2015 Silberline began the search for a consulting firm that could assist them not only with transitioning to ISO 9001:2015 (along with ISO 14001:2015 for 1 site) , but also a company that understood the complexities of international, multisite and corporate certifications. SimpleQuE fit that criteria and assigned 4 consultants and a project manager to work with the quality teams at the headquarters in Tamaqua, PA and 3 other manufacturing sites in PA, IN and Scotland to prepare them for the transition. By September 2017 they had addressed the gaps in their quality systems, implemented new quality management software and were ready for their surveillance audits with BSI Group.  As a result, all 4 sites passed and received their ISO 9001:2015 certifications! In addition, the Scotland site also transitioned to ISO 14001:2015.  Congratulations to the entire Silberline team!

Photo taken at Silberline Global Headquarters – Tamaqua, PA

Front Row: Sheila Setcavage (Quality System Manager), Jennifer Mikovich (Site Manager, Hometown), Lisa Scheller (Chairman), Jan Moos (VP Innovation/New Product Development), Herb Whildin (Manager, Pilot Plant/Process Improvement/Technical Support)

Back Row: Blake Russell (simpleQuE Consultant), Tom Schwarz (Global CFO), Gary Karnish (CEO), Chris Gross (Interim VP Operations), David Stanko (VP Technical Service/Quality Functions)


12 Years At The Toyota Opportunity Exchange

For the last 12 years simpleQuE has attended the Toyota Opportunity Exchange (TOE) to network with Tier I suppliers like Dana Incorporated. Dana has 100+ facilities and 29,000 employees in 34 countries making it one of the world’s most influential automotive suppliers. Through the TOE, a relationship was developed with Dana and in 2013 simpleQuE won the opportunity to perform IATF 16949:2009 internal audits for the Dana site in Auburn Hills, MI. That opportunity has expanded to now include internal audits and/or IATF 16949:2016 transition consulting at five more Dana facilities in PA, IN, TN and KY. SimpleQuE consultants worked with the dedicated Quality team at Dana – Gordonsville, TN which recently successfully transitioned to IATF 16949. The first of our clients to do so!

Providing a forum for suppliers and minority business enterprises to connect is just one of the many ways that Toyota ensures its supplier base continues to reflect the diversity of its customers, partners and team members.