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SimpleQuE’s IATF 16949 Gap Audit Checklist is Now Available!

Innovation concept. Businessman throw a paper plane symbolizing acceleration and innovation.

The automotive quality standard has come a long way since its first inception in 1994.  With the new standard and more than 200 changes, simpleQuE recognized the need for an IATF Gap Audit Checklist to assist companies with the transition. The checklist includes the new automotive requirements (IATF 16949:2016 and ISO 9001:2015) and is intended to be used as a tool to identify both compliance with the new requirements and the differences between ISO/TS 16949:2009 and the new requirements.

The utilization of this checklist, when populated with objective evidence of compliance and non-compliance, will satisfactorily demonstrate you have audited the differences between ISO/TS 16949 standard and the new requirements.  It should be used with your certification body as evidence of internal audits to the new IATF 16949 and ISO 9001:2015 requirements.  It’s one of the methods simpleQuE auditors and consultants use with our own clients.

A free half hour of phone or email consulting with a simpleQuE expert is included with the checklist for the purchase price of $300.

The simpleQuE team wishes you a smooth and simple transition!

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Innovators Who Changed The World With Standards

Innovation concept. Businessman throw a paper plane symbolizing acceleration and innovation.

Think of all the important advances that have taken place in the last 100 years and they all began with unique individuals who had vision. Whether a scientist, an inventor, or just an inquisitive person, each decided to approach a problem in a new way.  And in doing so they opened the doors to new technology and advancements. Here are three innovators who have rewritten the world of quality and innovation:

André Borschberg
Energy never disappears; it just changes form. This physics principle was a founding driver for Borschberg when he decided to create an airplane that could change the sun’s energy into aerial propulsion. The idea of harnessing the sun’s energy wasn’t new; solar energy was already being used for electricity. However, Borschberg was able to create a new human record by flying a plane powered just by the sun’s captured energy. And he credits aerospace standards for giving Borschberg’s team the ability to make an experimental flying concept possible.

Dr. Yoshiyuki Sankai
For decades, those paralyzed from the waist down, have relied on wheelchairs for mobility.  However, Sankai and his team have been instrumental in creating robot suits that can support and enhance body functions. And that has changed the world of paraplegics by allowing them to accomplish activities not possible before. Most importantly, Sankai notes that without standards, Cyberdyne would not have been able to develop and launch its robotic creations.

Naty Barak
Creating a way to make water go farther where it’s a rare, valuable commodity is key to growing more crops. For areas with desert and arid conditions, a way to make water stretch farther via new irrigation methods is critical. Barak created a system that applies water directly to the plant’s roots optimizing water usage and lessening impact on the environment. The means of mass-producing this method of irrigation only happened via standards in Barak’s view.

These three innovators are among a number of creators who are changing the world in a variety of ways. But one thing they all have in common is the use of standards to ensure quality and achieve their uncommon goals. Connect with SimpleQue to find out more about quality and environmental management system standards and how they can improve your organization.


SimpleQuE Attends NQAs Teaming Conference

IMG_0061SimpleQuE’s program manager, Shirley Kennedy is attending NQA’s teaming conference in Orlando, FL. Today’s session imparts an indepth understanding of the Automotive Standard, IATF 16949:2016 with a clause-by-clause review so simpleQuE can share the latest information from NQA’s experts. According to Steve Barnes, Aerospace and Automotive Operations Manager, transitioning to the new standard will take some time as there are more than 200 changes, some of which are significant.

“NQA offers a series of in depth training sessions for consultants and auditors that provide a foundation to support their clients across a variety of standards, including IATF 16949”, says Christi Friedrichs, Director of Business Development at NQA. “We bring consultants and auditors in from around the world to provide a global venue of experiences, lessons learned, and important information regarding changes and transitions within the standards. These interactive sessions provide not only the latest information, but also an environment for attendees to share experiences across industry sectors”, she said.



Look Fors – Part 1: Context of the Organization

Research

What are 3rd party auditors looking for?  This is the first of a three part series by Jim Lee, President of simpleQuE

Clause 4 of Annex SL – Context of the Organization

This is the cornerstone of a management system and the business’ strategic direction.  An organization needs to identify internal and external issues that can impact its intended outcomes, as well as all interested parties and their requirements.  It needs to document its scope and set the boundaries of the management system to line up with business objectives.

The context doesn’t have to be documented, so 3rd party auditors (as well as internal auditors) will be asking questions of various management members, and looking for these as objective evidence that an organization understands its context and considers all the factors and stakeholders affecting the business.  The items listed below don’t have to exist, but if they do, you want to take credit for them in understanding the context.  Some items may not by themselves demonstrate an understanding of the context, but combined with multiple examples, can provide the evidence an auditor is looking for.

  • Business plan
  • Strategic plan
  • SWOT analysis (Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats)
  • Vision and mission statement
  • Process mapping
  • External parties identified
  • Lesson learned
  • Surveys
  • Internal meeting minutes to determine company goal setting
  • Metrics to measure effectiveness of QMS
  • Process turtle diagrams
  • Process flow plans
  • Quality manual

Not that all of the elements listed above will be needed, but organizations may risk failure if they do not:

  • Identify or understand their primary competitors
  • Mention civic responsibility
  • Consider future business trends
  • Identify all customer requirements
  • Identify local/state/national requirements
  • Identify required outputs needed for internal customers
  • Identify uncertainties like negative risks or positive opportunities
  • Determine the processes used to flow the business from quote to delivery
  • Identify outsources processes
  • Establish process goals

 

Coming in future articles – what auditors are looking for in regard to Leadership and Risk.

 


7 Lessons Businesses Can Learn From Watching Football

Midsection of American football player holding helmet and ball against american football arena

Watching the big game? Here are a few takeaways that apply to any business.

 

  1. You’re only as strong as your weakest link
    Football is a team sport, and so is business. A weak link in the supply chain can be detrimental to a business that fails to assess supply chain risk management.. SimpleQuE’s supply chain audits and corrective actions drive supplier development and can identify risks to your company.
  1. Sometimes you have to take the punt to score the touchdown
    Football is all about taking risks. Going for a field goal is an easy way to score three points, but punting the ball could result in a touchdown for seven points. Just as the coach examines the possible outcomes before making the decision to go for a field goal or a punt, ISO 9001 calls for a manager to use a risk-based thinking cap. Organizations are asked to identify, analyze and prioritize all potential risks as they undergo implementation or upgrading their existing quality management system for certification.
  1. When the plan fails, change the plan
    Things do not always go as planned on the football field. It’s not an ideal situation, but by quickly adapting to the current circumstances, the most effective teams can often salvage a few yards rather than giving up. Similarly, companies often need to come together, improvise and move forward in the face of adversity.
  1. Always play the long game
    Sure, the other team may score a touchdown in the first few minutes of the game. Instead of focusing on what went wrong, the best teams keep a long-term perspective. And in business, try not to get caught up in the day-to-day—rather, focus on long-term quality and excellence.
  1. Training is important
    Far before the game starts, football players have spent days and weeks practicing and training to ensure they’re ready to play. Consider offering plentiful opportunities for training, such as SimpleQuE’s slate of courses covering internal auditing, root cause analysis and problem solving, and more.
  1. Understand the competition
    The best coaches understand that beating the other team is often more about understanding their strengths and weaknesses than it is about playing your best. Businesses can employ the same strategy when it comes to their competition. Understand what advantages other companies have while also learning their key weaknesses is essential to your own success.
  1. Always watch the highlight reel
    In football and in business, it’s essential to learn from your past mistakes as well as to repeat your past successes. Every situation has an upside, and provides opportunities to learn and move forward. As we always emphasize when working with companies on ISO, AS, or IATF implementation, Once plans are implemented, it’s essential for organizations to check the effectiveness of their actions and continually learn from experience.


SimpleQuE Spotlight: Barb Dodson

SQ-spotlight

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer Deanne Sparr welcomed Barb with these words, “We’re thrilled to have Barb as part of the simpleQuE team! Her attention to detail and knowledge of certification requirements is exactly the support we are excited to add to our staff and to provide to our clients.”

 

What is your name?  Barbara Dodson.

What is your position and what do you do for simpleQuE?  Operations Manager – I’m responsible for client relations and oversight of the performance of audit activities. I am also a lead auditor for ISO 9001.

How long have you worked for simpleQuE? I joined simpleQuE on Oct 31, 2016.

What do you like most about working for simpleQuE?  SimpleQuE doesn’t take a one-size-fits-all approach – we understand that each client is unique and has different needs.

What is your greatest accomplishment – work or personal? My greatest personal accomplishment is raising two wonderful children.

When you are not working, where can people find you? Either spending time with my family or relaxing with a good book.

What is your hometown? Canton, OH.

Client satisfaction is pinnacle to your background. What are your client-focused approaches to simpleQuE? I am quick to follow up on any questions and or concerns, I like to pick up the phone and talk to our clients. In this day and age it’s so easy to send off an email, but I have always found that most clients really like to speak to someone personally.

Explain how simpleQuE is different from their competition. Most of our staff and subcontractors have certification body experience which I believe makes a very big difference.

Where is your favorite getaway? I love the beach and one of my favorite vacation spots is Cancun.

How would other people describe you in three words? Ethical, passionate about things that I believe in and caring.


ISO Trivia

Wooden Blocks with the text: Trivia

Quality Excellence is the foundation of our business at simpleQuE, as well as part of our name – (notice the Qu and E).  To celebrate National Trivia Day, we gathered some interesting facts from around the world about Quality Management and its important role in every business we serve. We hope you enjoy this fun trivia and learn something new about ISO and quality.

Happy Trivia Day!

  1. The term ISO (as in ISO standard) derives from the Greek word “isos,” which means equal.
  2. Many quality terms, tools, and methods were popularized in Japan— kaizen, gemba, muda, kanban, etc.
  3. In Germany, 77 percent of organizations provide ISO training and 82 percent provide general quality management training—the highest of any group of organizations.(2)
  4. The Pareto principle, or 80-20 rule, states that 80 percent of problems come from 20 percent of causes, and that management should concentrate on the 20 percent. It was popularized by Joseph M. Juran.
  5. Twenty percent of senior executives rate their quality programs as world class, but only 5 percent of quality professionals do the same. (4)
  6. Philip B. Crosby is perhaps best known for promoting a standard of excellence based on nothing—the concept of zero defects.
  7. The “Big Q” refers to comparing differences between managing for quality in all business processes and products; while the “little q” relates to managing quality in a limited capacity, traditionally in factory products and processes.
  8. One of the world’s best-known standards is ISO 9001.
  9. Plan-do-check-act is not only the name of a popular process improvement method, it’s also the title of a music CD released in 2014 by a New Jersey-based rock trio Recovery Council.
  10. Edwards Deming introduced the 14 points for management, which, he said, “have one aim: to make it possible for people to work with joy.”

 

Sources:

  1. Time Magazine, http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1908719_1908717_1908537,00.html
  2. ASQ Global State of Quality research, 2013. www.globalstateofquality.org
  3. The Economic Impacts of Inadequate Infrastructure for Software study, prepared by RTI for the National of Standards and Technology, 2002. http://www.nist.gov/director/planning/upload/report02-3.pdf
  4. ASQ/Forbes Insights Culture of Quality, 2014. www.cultureofquality.org