Coming Soon: Core Tools – an International Collaboration – By Kim Roan

On the heels of the revision of TS 16949 to IATF 16949 the AIAG (USA) and VDA-QMC (Germany) are collaborating to improve the automotive Core Tools.  These Core Tools are the building blocks of an effective quality management system and include Advanced Product Quality Planning & Control Plan (APQP), Production Part Approval Process (PPAP), Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Measurement System Analysis (MSA), and Statistical Process Control (SPC). Their starting point, aimed at improving risk assessment automotive industry wide, is the FMEA manual.

The Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG) was established in 1982 and the German Industry Automotive Assn. (VDA-QMC) in 1997.  Each organization serves as the IATF oversite office in their respective country. Both organizations serve the automotive industry by standardizing publications for the industry and by providing automotive industry training.

Currently suppliers to both North American and German OEMs are required to use different FMEA rating tables for severity, occurrence, and detection.  This has created confusion and related frustration for both suppliers and OEMs. The primary goal of the current collaboration is to revise the rating tables to provide a common rating scale for risk accepted by all German and North American OEMs.  The secondary goal is to update the manual in areas that need revision to support risk analysis and harmonize the documents overall. This is a great opportunity to combine the strengths from each FMEA manual with improved risk assessment tools that will support the advancing technology of the automotive industry.

The targeted release of the revised FMEA manual is December 2018 followed by OEM release of their customer specific requirements to support the changes.  AIAG and VDA-QMC plan further collaboration to continue harmonization and update of all automotive core tools manuals. These tools have proved so useful that they have also been adopted by the aerospace and defense manufacturing sectors. SimpleQuE has been preparing for the changes and developing the training needed for companies to implement the updated FMEA requirements.  Let our automotive experts partner with you as you roll out your FMEA upgrades to meet automotive customer demand and take your FMEA risk analysis to a higher level.

About the author:  Kim Roan has completed her undergrad in Mechanical Engineering and her Master’s in Psychology with an emphasis in Organizational Leadership.  Kim is a simpleQuE consultant with over 20 years automotive industry experience with 11 years working for a German automotive supplier in the USA and experience supplying OEMs in North America, Germany and Asia across the years of her career.

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The Time Is Now – Preparing for a Successful IATF 16949 Transition

Automotive industry manufacture line with different metal parts

The transition to IATF 16949 has been a rough one according to industry experts.  More than 68,000 organizations certified to IATF 16949:2009 (and 6,382 companies in the US) will need to undergo a transition audit to IATF 16949:2016. As of April 2017, 181 upgrade audits had been completed, resulting in an average of 5.3 nonconformities and approximately one major nonconformity (.73) per audit.

The top five nonconformities overall are “total productive maintenance” (48 nonconformities), “control plan” (38), “contingency plans” (37), “control of production service provision” (26), and “internal auditor competency” (23). Based on automotive industry datathe top-five major nonconformance clauses are customer-specific requirements (7 nonconformities), internal auditor competency (7), quality management system (QMS) audit (7), TPM (6), and management review inputs (6).

For companies that have yet to transition to IATF 16949, you do not want to wait any longer. The deadline for suppliers to transition to the new standard is your next scheduled annual audit.  All audits as of October 2017 have to be to the new IATF standard.   And note that the IATF will not be granting waivers for organizations that can’t meet the transition plan timing.

According to Russ Hopkins, head of supplier technical assistance for Ford Motor Company, “Globally, over 1,200 audits need to take place each week, which averages out to about one per week per auditor,” he said. “This is doable with the proper planning.  It’s doable as long as people do not wait until the last minute.”

This process can seem daunting to suppliers, but Hopkins notes there are several steps to a successful IATF 16949 transition:

  • Confirm dates for the transition audit with your certification body. Upgrade has to occur at your next scheduled audit.
  • Develop a work plan back from the date of the transition audit
  • Review the requirements and provide feedback regarding any concerns (suppliers contact AIAG, certification bodies contact their oversight offices, and OEM through their IATF representative)
  • Allow enough time after the transition audit to address any non-conformances. All findings must be closed in 60 days.

For those with an existing IATF 16949 certificate with one or more nonconformities of the audit to IATF 16949 which are not either 100% resolved or closed within the required timeframe, the transition audit will be considered “failed” and the IATF database will be updated accordingly.  The certification decision shall be negative which means the IATF 16949:2009 certificate is withdrawn and the client has to start over with an initial certification audit. (International Automotive Task Force)

For more information on transitioning to IATF 16949 visit our website.

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At simpleQuE it’s not just our name that represents quality excellence, it’s our unique combination of consultants, knowledge and expertise.  We believe in serving our clients before, during and after the certification process. This value added service consists of an ongoing education process on the quality standards through our website, newsletters social media, and blog. Each month, we provide updates on the latest news from the ISO, AIAG, ASA, IAOB and IATF standards community, and what we’re is seeing in the industry.

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October Training

ISO 9001:2015 ImplementationOctober 16, 2015
Columbus, OH
This course is for companies and their teams who are implementing ISO 9001:2015 and working toward upgrading from 2008, or obtaining certification or compliance for the first time.  We share the proven, simple approach and educate you on the requirements to know what is required to become certified.  In a half day, we can give you the tools and approach to accelerate your program, and get your implementation team moving forward with a clear roadmap to achieve your certification goal to ISO 9001:2015.

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