Congratulations to the Amatec Micro-Poise Team!

Amatec Micro-Poise (Streetsboro, Ohio) – ISO 9001:2015 Certified

Micro-Poise Measurement Systems (a business unit of Amatec, Inc.) provides a complete line of high performance production and laboratory equipment used by manufactures globally to meet their test, measurement and inspection requirements.  This equipment allows customers in the Tire, Wheel, and Automotive industries to assess and correct the balance, uniformity and geometry of tires, wheels, tire & wheels assemblies, power train components, and other products. 

Recognizing the value of a solid quality management system, Amatec Micro-Poise began working with simpleQuE consultant, Jen Briese in March 2018 to implement ISO 9001. By July they passed their certification audit with Smithers Quality Assessments with no findings.  It’s evident this team works hard to provide exceptional craftsmanship with every machine they build.  And by designing and manufacturing quality products, they will always strive to exceed their customers’ expectations.

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Coming Soon: Core Tools – an International Collaboration – By Kim Roan

On the heels of the revision of TS 16949 to IATF 16949 the AIAG (USA) and VDA-QMC (Germany) are collaborating to improve the automotive Core Tools.  These Core Tools are the building blocks of an effective quality management system and include Advanced Product Quality Planning & Control Plan (APQP), Production Part Approval Process (PPAP), Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Measurement System Analysis (MSA), and Statistical Process Control (SPC). Their starting point, aimed at improving risk assessment automotive industry wide, is the FMEA manual.

The Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG) was established in 1982 and the German Industry Automotive Assn. (VDA-QMC) in 1997.  Each organization serves as the IATF oversite office in their respective country. Both organizations serve the automotive industry by standardizing publications for the industry and by providing automotive industry training.

Currently suppliers to both North American and German OEMs are required to use different FMEA rating tables for severity, occurrence, and detection.  This has created confusion and related frustration for both suppliers and OEMs. The primary goal of the current collaboration is to revise the rating tables to provide a common rating scale for risk accepted by all German and North American OEMs.  The secondary goal is to update the manual in areas that need revision to support risk analysis and harmonize the documents overall. This is a great opportunity to combine the strengths from each FMEA manual with improved risk assessment tools that will support the advancing technology of the automotive industry.

The targeted release of the revised FMEA manual is December 2018 followed by OEM release of their customer specific requirements to support the changes.  AIAG and VDA-QMC plan further collaboration to continue harmonization and update of all automotive core tools manuals. These tools have proved so useful that they have also been adopted by the aerospace and defense manufacturing sectors. SimpleQuE has been preparing for the changes and developing the training needed for companies to implement the updated FMEA requirements.  Let our automotive experts partner with you as you roll out your FMEA upgrades to meet automotive customer demand and take your FMEA risk analysis to a higher level.

About the author:  Kim Roan has completed her undergrad in Mechanical Engineering and her Master’s in Psychology with an emphasis in Organizational Leadership.  Kim is a simpleQuE consultant with over 20 years automotive industry experience with 11 years working for a German automotive supplier in the USA and experience supplying OEMs in North America, Germany and Asia across the years of her career.

What happens if a company drops their ISO/TS 16949 certification, but still wants to maintain their automotive customers?

Question mark heap on table concept for confusion, question or solution

That’s a question that some automotive suppliers are facing as they weigh the various costs and options of meeting the requirements of the new IATF standard. Deanne Sparr, simpleQuE’s Vice President, has discussed this area of concern with a variety of companies who don’t feel they are ready to transition.  Some companies in this situation that kept the IATF scope and continued with the certification audit, under the new IATF Rules, found that the auditor is not permitted to stop the audit and is allowed to write as many findings as needed.  This resulted in IATF audits having over 30+ findings that all then need resolved within 90 days.

Deanne explains, “In this situation, it would be preferable to have an assessment to ISO 9001:2015 only.  By achieving ISO 9001:2015 with this upgrade, you will be meeting the minimum requirements of IATF (clause 8.4.2.3) so customers can continue to source to you.  On the other hand, with any major findings from an IATF audit, your status in the automotive supplier database may affect the ability of automotive customers to source to you during that time.”

To satisfy a company’s automotive customers, Deanne recommends implementing MAQMSR.  This is the Minimum Automotive Quality Management System Requirements for sub-tier suppliers.  It was written by FCA and Ford and is permitted as part of development toward IATF certification with the IATF mandating customers’ approval. (Refer to IATF Sanctioned Interpretation #8.) This is an especially beneficial and cost effective approach for small sub-tier businesses, and for organizations with a diverse portfolio containing a small percentage of automotive business.  Compliance to this standard also satisfies the intent of an automotive supplier to develop and pursue the automotive requirements.  This translates to less risk for automotive customers to use you over a competitor who only has ISO, according to the new IATF requirements (clause 8.4.2.3) that they must now follow.

SimpleQuE has a 4-step consulting approach to assist companies with MAQMSR compliance.  The first step consists of a gap analysis to review the current system and match it to the requirements of MAQMSR.  Next, any gaps found are incorporated into a project plan or action list.  Based on the gaps and level of internal resources, you may opt to manage the project plan to close the gaps or allow one of our simpleQue automotive industry experts to guide you through the process.  Following completion of the MAQMSR compliance process simpleQuE has IATF certified auditors who can perform the MAQMSR compliance audit (steps 3 and/or 4).  Upon completion of the audit and closing of findings, simpleQuEwill issue your company a letter of compliance to MAQMSR that can be shared with potential and current customers.  Certification to ISO 9001 with compliance to MAQMSR will help your company retain current automotive business and increase biding opportunities for new automotive business.

Contact us regarding your management system needs.  SimpleQuE has helped many single and multi-site manufacturing companies who struggled with the ISO 9001:2015 and IATF 16949:2016 standard upgrades.  Let us help you find a customized and effective solution to update and advance your management system in a way that makes sense for your organization.

IATF 16949 Certification – The Automotive Quality Standard

Industrial automotive machine tool equipment close up, abstract industry manufacturing metalwork background, blue toned

IATF 16949 is the global standard recognized by the automotive industry. IATF 16949 defines the quality management system requirements (QMS) for the design and development, production assembly, installation and services of automotive-related products including products with embedded software. The focus of this standard and IATF16949 certification is the development of a QMS that provides for continual improvement, emphasizing defect prevention and the reduction of waste in the supply chain. Combined with applicable Customer Specific Requirements, IATF 16949 is also fully aligned with the structure and requirements of ISO 9001:2015 which was designed to assure effective quality management systems for manufacturing and service industries around the world.

The Characteristics of IATF 16949 Certification

Developed by the International Automotive Task Force, IATF 16949 has a variety of automotive industry-specific features, including:

  • Defect prevention
  • Reduction of variation and waste in the supply chain
  • Customer focus and satisfaction
  • Identification of risks and problems in the production process
  • Management of resources
  • Product realization
  • Responsibility of management
  • Measurement, analysis and improvement

There are over 68,000 suppliers worldwide which currently have ISO/TS 16949 or IATF16949:2016 certification.  The standard can be used by any supplier, large or small who manufacture customer-specified production parts, service parts, and/or accessory parts.

 

How do you cross the finish line to become IATF Certified?

If you’re searching for an IATF 16949:2016 consultant, our team at simpleQuE is well positioned to support your IATF 16949 and MAQMSR consulting (Minimum Automotive Quality Management System Requirements), certification, maintenance, training and internal auditing needs. Our consultants are qualified, certified, competent and are experts on the automotive standards, customer specific requirements, and AIAG or VDA core tools. In addition, many are current or former 3rd party auditors who bring valuable insight because of the knowledge gained from auditing for certification bodies.

SimpleQuE also offers a full line-up of IATF 16949 training courses which includes AIAG and VDA Core Tools, Root Cause Analysis and Problem Solving, Requirements and Implementation.  With IATF also putting a major focus on internal auditor competency, it is essential to have IATF 16949 Internal Auditor Training. Our IATF 16949 auditor training utilizes the process audit approach. Contact us to learn more about the customized services offered to match your certification and training needs.

What is ISO 9001 Certification and Why is it so Important?

The ISO 9001 standard exists to provide organizations with the opportunity to develop baseline quality management systems, improve processes and meet the needs of customers. Achieving ISO 9001 certification is an important step for manufacturers and service providers, as it emphasizes performance while proving a dedication to quality and customers.

As ISO 9001 certification has been adopted across a wide range of industries, the standards have been altered to fit specific industry requirements. From the automotive and aerospace industries to telecommunications companies, laboratory settings, medical device manufacturers and more, each industry has adopted its own set of standards that all derive from the basic principles of the ISO 9000 series.

What are the Benefits of ISO 9001 Certification?
There are a variety of advantages to having ISO 9001 certification. It creates a more efficient, effective operation for a company, if implemented properly, and also improves employee awareness and motivation, and increases customer satisfaction. Here are some additional reasons to get ISO 9001 certified:

  • Client Requirements – More and more customers are demanding that their vendors be certified. If your business doesn’t meet this criteria you could be losing out on sales.
  • Increased Revenue – Studies show that ISO 9001 certified organizations are paid 7% more on average, have better sales growth and an improved ROA. (source: iso.org)
  • Reduce Waste – By establishing the rigor of an ISO 9001 Quality Management System, you can reduce inefficiency and make the most of your business’ time and resources.
  • Brand Image – Maintaining quality in your organization minimizes the chance of a slip up or error that could hurt your reputation.
  • Manage Risk – ISO 9001:2015 is all about managing risk. By adopting these standards you will learn how to best identify and mitigate threats to your business model.

Most importantly, as your company grows, becoming certified is vital to fostering continued success in the future.

SimpleQuE – ISO 9001 Certification Experts

SimpleQuE (an ISO 9001 certified company) assists organizations with implementation, improvement or transition of the standards by providing customized ISO 9000 consulting, training and internal auditing services and solutions. Contact us for more information or to hire an ISO 9001 consultant.

SimpleQuE Attends Toyota’s 2018 Power of Exchange

Diversity drives Toyota which is why simpleQuE’s VP, Deanne Sparr, is at Toyota’s 2018 Power of Exchange – a unique supplier diversity and development conference for diverse businesses. This is a targeted networking event to gain and share knowledge and build relationships with current Toyota Tier I Suppliers like Dana Incorporated. Dana has 100+ facilities and 29,000 employees in 34 countries making it one of the world’s most influential automotive suppliers.

Over the years, a relationship was developed with Dana and in 2013 simpleQuE won the opportunity to perform IATF 16949:2009 internal audits for the Dana site in Auburn Hills, MI. That opportunity has expanded to now include internal audits and/or IATF 16949:2016 transition consulting at 10 more Dana facilities in OH, PA, IN, TN and KY. Seven of the eleven sites have already successfully transitioned to IATF 16949!

At simpleQuE we like to challenge what looks to be impossible and make quality excellence “simple.”

Not ready for IATF Certification? MAQMSR May Be an Option

worker with protective mask welding metal. in Industrial automotive part. in car production factory.

For automotive suppliers who are having a difficult time meeting the requirements of the new IATF 16949 quality standard, Minimum Automotive Quality Management System Requirements for Sub-Tier Suppliers (MAQMSR) may be an option you want to consider in conjunction with ISO 9001 certification.  With initial audit results coming in from certification bodies, it is evident that companies are failing to comply and in some cases IATF certification can’t be achieved.

IAOB released the top IATF 16949 findings based on 3,172 audits conducted as of August 2017 – the top 5 non-conformances overall were written against:

  • 5.1.5 Total productive maintenance
  • 5.1.1 Control plan
  • 1.2.3 Contingency plans
  • 5.1 Control of production and service provision
  • 2.3 Internal auditor competency

As an option for suppliers, the Minimum Automotive Quality Management System Requirements for Sub-Tier Suppliers (MAQMSR) was released in September 2017 as a possible intermediate step for a supplier’s Quality Management System (QMS) under the authorization of IATF 16949, Section 8.4.2.3.c and Sanctioned Interpretation, SI #8.

Conformance to MAQMSR helps a lower tiered supplier transition to IATF 16949 by allowing many of the key Automotive Requirements to be met while developing the remainder of the QMS. The ultimate goal of the supplier development process is to achieve 3rd party registration to IATF 16949.  It is important to note that the customer determines the path and steps, so approval must first be obtained before proceeding.  The suggested steps of supplier development referencing 8.4.2.3 are as follows:

  1. Certification to ISO 9001 through 3rd party audits
  2. Certification to ISO 9001 + compliance to MAQMSR through 2nd party audits* (suppliers who did not achieve upgrade transition may consider this)
  3. Certification to ISO 9001 + compliance to IATF 16949 through 2nd party audits*
  4. Then finally certification to IATF 16949 through third party audits

MAQMSR aligns the Automotive QMS Requirements with the corresponding IATF 16949:2016 section(s); however, it is not certifiable or a third party auditable standard, though the guideline may be referenced during a second party audit *(by customer or with a qualified 2nd party like simpleQuE).

SimpleQuE consultants have been assisting companies to understand their options and make the change to drop IATF 16949 and prepare for ISO 9001:2015 certification.  Upon receiving  customer approval to use 2nd party audits to be compliant with MAQMSR, our consultants can provide guidance for that process and perform the audits.  For more information on MAQMSR, contact us.

The Time Is Now – Preparing for a Successful IATF 16949 Transition

Automotive industry manufacture line with different metal parts

The transition to IATF 16949 has been a rough one according to industry experts.  More than 68,000 organizations certified to IATF 16949:2009 (and 6,382 companies in the US) will need to undergo a transition audit to IATF 16949:2016. As of April 2017, 181 upgrade audits had been completed, resulting in an average of 5.3 nonconformities and approximately one major nonconformity (.73) per audit.

The top five nonconformities overall are “total productive maintenance” (48 nonconformities), “control plan” (38), “contingency plans” (37), “control of production service provision” (26), and “internal auditor competency” (23). Based on automotive industry datathe top-five major nonconformance clauses are customer-specific requirements (7 nonconformities), internal auditor competency (7), quality management system (QMS) audit (7), TPM (6), and management review inputs (6).

For companies that have yet to transition to IATF 16949, you do not want to wait any longer. The deadline for suppliers to transition to the new standard is your next scheduled annual audit.  All audits as of October 2017 have to be to the new IATF standard.   And note that the IATF will not be granting waivers for organizations that can’t meet the transition plan timing.

According to Russ Hopkins, head of supplier technical assistance for Ford Motor Company, “Globally, over 1,200 audits need to take place each week, which averages out to about one per week per auditor,” he said. “This is doable with the proper planning.  It’s doable as long as people do not wait until the last minute.”

This process can seem daunting to suppliers, but Hopkins notes there are several steps to a successful IATF 16949 transition:

  • Confirm dates for the transition audit with your certification body. Upgrade has to occur at your next scheduled audit.
  • Develop a work plan back from the date of the transition audit
  • Review the requirements and provide feedback regarding any concerns (suppliers contact AIAG, certification bodies contact their oversight offices, and OEM through their IATF representative)
  • Allow enough time after the transition audit to address any non-conformances. All findings must be closed in 60 days.

For those with an existing IATF 16949 certificate with one or more nonconformities of the audit to IATF 16949 which are not either 100% resolved or closed within the required timeframe, the transition audit will be considered “failed” and the IATF database will be updated accordingly.  The certification decision shall be negative which means the IATF 16949:2009 certificate is withdrawn and the client has to start over with an initial certification audit. (International Automotive Task Force)

For more information on transitioning to IATF 16949 visit our website.