AS9100, AS9110 and AS9120 Transition/Upgrade Relief

By Jim Lee

The International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG) and ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board (ANAB) have published the linked notifications referencing Resolutions #150 and #152 that they will be allowing companies and certification bodies that have not completed the full transition and upgrade audits by 9/15/18 a little bit of relief.  This is intended to not penalize the certified AS companies when the certification bodies don’t have enough resources to get their clients completely through the upgrade or transitions with new certificates issued before the 9/15/18 expiration.  Not every certification body may honor this or have the resources to do this, so we still see some possibility to transfer.

What these IAQG and ANAB releases state are that the certification body and AS client can  work together to begin the certification upgrade, transition or transfer audit by 9/15/18, or before the current AS certificate expires.  All parties will be given up to 6 months beyond 9/15/18 to complete the upgrade/transition or transfer audit, close findings from the audit, process the registration approval through the certification body office, and issue the new certificate before 3/15/19.

This is not an extension.  The OASIS database will show your company with an expired AS certificate after 9/15/18, until the issue of the new certificate.  It just prevents the AS company from paying for a full initial certification audit (more audit days) and extends the timing past 9/15/18 to complete the upgrade/transition process through the certification body process and closure of findings.

This will cause some hardship on your AS customers who must track and conduct a risk analysis of any supplier who has expired or lost certifications.  The certification status is public information in the OASIS database and will show as expired after 9/15/18.  There will be further scrutiny on AS certified companies by their customers who let their certification completely lapse by 9/15/18.

SimpleQuE consultants can prepare and guide your company through the transition process, contact us to find out how.

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Transition Time

The deadline for transition to ISO 9001:2015, ISO 14001:2015, AS9100:2016 and IATF 16949:2016 is fast approaching. Have you completed the transition process? If not, take a look at our blog post “The Countdown Begins” to learn how to get started before it’s too late.

Note that if your next audit is a recertification and upgrade, you will need to perform the audit at least 2 months prior to your certificate expiring to give you enough time to address any potential nonconformance issues.

 

The Time Is Now – Preparing for a Successful IATF 16949 Transition

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The transition to IATF 16949 has been a rough one according to industry experts.  More than 68,000 organizations certified to IATF 16949:2009 (and 6,382 companies in the US) will need to undergo a transition audit to IATF 16949:2016. As of April 2017, 181 upgrade audits had been completed, resulting in an average of 5.3 nonconformities and approximately one major nonconformity (.73) per audit.

The top five nonconformities overall are “total productive maintenance” (48 nonconformities), “control plan” (38), “contingency plans” (37), “control of production service provision” (26), and “internal auditor competency” (23). Based on automotive industry datathe top-five major nonconformance clauses are customer-specific requirements (7 nonconformities), internal auditor competency (7), quality management system (QMS) audit (7), TPM (6), and management review inputs (6).

For companies that have yet to transition to IATF 16949, you do not want to wait any longer. The deadline for suppliers to transition to the new standard is your next scheduled annual audit.  All audits as of October 2017 have to be to the new IATF standard.   And note that the IATF will not be granting waivers for organizations that can’t meet the transition plan timing.

According to Russ Hopkins, head of supplier technical assistance for Ford Motor Company, “Globally, over 1,200 audits need to take place each week, which averages out to about one per week per auditor,” he said. “This is doable with the proper planning.  It’s doable as long as people do not wait until the last minute.”

This process can seem daunting to suppliers, but Hopkins notes there are several steps to a successful IATF 16949 transition:

  • Confirm dates for the transition audit with your certification body. Upgrade has to occur at your next scheduled audit.
  • Develop a work plan back from the date of the transition audit
  • Review the requirements and provide feedback regarding any concerns (suppliers contact AIAG, certification bodies contact their oversight offices, and OEM through their IATF representative)
  • Allow enough time after the transition audit to address any non-conformances. All findings must be closed in 60 days.

For those with an existing IATF 16949 certificate with one or more nonconformities of the audit to IATF 16949 which are not either 100% resolved or closed within the required timeframe, the transition audit will be considered “failed” and the IATF database will be updated accordingly.  The certification decision shall be negative which means the IATF 16949:2009 certificate is withdrawn and the client has to start over with an initial certification audit. (International Automotive Task Force)

For more information on transitioning to IATF 16949 visit our website.

The AS9100:2016 Transition Timeline

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Certified companies to AS9100C will need to upgrade to AS9100D from when their certification body can begin issuing certificates (sometime late in 2016) through June 14, 2018. This should typically coincide with a scheduled surveillance or recertification audit. A special audit can also be scheduled and paid for. You should plan your upgrade based on this transition timing window and when your audit cycle falls.